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NYU Abu Dhabi - showUcare stories

 

Rasha Shraim:

‘‘Why do I volunteer? The answer seems too obvious. However, I don’t have an eloquent response. I volunteer because, for me, it’s simply a must. I volunteer simply because I care and I feel indebted. We take and take and most often forget the part where we have to give back. This is my way of saying thank you. At the thrift store, many low-income people come in to pick out some tired clothes and things that even at insignificant costs, many cannot afford. The little that I give to keep the store functioning is a small part of my university’s thank you to our Abu Dhabi community.’’ 

Nicole Lopez del Carril:

‘‘I volunteer because I have been gifted an amazing education and opportunities, and I believe strongly in using the tools and resources I am fortunate to have to better the lives of those I come in contact with. I believe if we all dedicated our lives to changing a little of the world around us for the better, we would reveal a wonderful and beautiful world for everyone.’’

Geo Kamus:

‘‘Volunteering in migrant worker communities has touched a raw nerve within me. In college, it’s easy, almost expected, to be consumed by academics, extracurriculars, and other social norms. Though oftentimes stressful, they can be managed and solved in a relatively straightforward way. Outside this bubble, however, very different and very real challenges exist. Being with these people remind me that the world faces deeply complex issues that affects everyone, especially the marginalized communities I choose to serve. Engaging with them reminds me of these issues, and the responsibility I share in solving them.’’

Gaby Garcia:

‘‘I volunteer because my cause is important to me. Special education is important because with proper guidance, children with special needs have the opportunity to achieve higher levels of self-sufficiency and success in the future. Volunteering at the Ability Center for Special Needs has been one of the most rewarding experiences, because the students I have worked with inspire me and have shown me, through their dedication and achievements, how much progress can be made. I will continue to volunteer because I believe that I can make a change.’’

Juliana Bello:

‘‘My participation in the Somali Centre’s English program has been one of the most education parts of my NYUAD experience. I would recommend involvement with the centre to anyone interested in learning about curriculum development and, surprisingly, about relating to other people. It is easy to approach volunteering with a very prepared and calculated approach, e.g. asking the question “How can I best get to these people?” However, the unpredictable nature of the work at Somali Centre teaches you that the most effective way to volunteer is through creating an atmosphere of equality. There’s no need to trick anyone into learning—a solid curriculum and a fluid, sincere delivery that doesn’t set you above your students is effective enough.’’

 

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NYU Florence - Christina Bandini

Volunteering is important to me because of the happiness and smiles it brings. Volunteering has been part of my life growing up in many different capacities.

As an NYU Sophomore in the Steinhardt program majoring in elementary education, I have had an incredible opportunity working as a volunteer student teacher one day a week, teaching English at a Catholic Academy elementary school while studying abroad this Spring semester at NYU Florence.

 

Having the opportunity to work in a classroom has been absolutely wonderful; not only for the students, but for me volunteering works both ways! Seeing the children’s smiles that are radiating from their faces – and what I am experiencing while sharing with them goes without saying!

I leave the school each day with a true feeling like I have helped out in some small way. It is so invigorating spending my day as a volunteer at the school. I am fortunate to assist and work with the children not only by teaching and speaking English but sharing my background in the creative arts field as well. I have taught my classes Irish Step Dancing to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. I have been able to continue what I enjoy as a hobby and share this with the children who are so excited to learn new dance skills.

Having this opportunity to work with professional teachers here in Florence has given me a chance to experiment with what path I would like to take with my career. This opportunity has only assured me I am on the right track in pursuit of my major in the Steinhardt School and solidified my passion with working with young children.

Being away this semester in Florence I feel so much part of a community and involved by working at the school. I also volunteer on Sunday’s as an assistant catechism teacher here at a small church that has been my Parish since moving to Florence. Keeping busy has always been my nature — I have only gained from the programs I have participated in as a volunteer. I could not feel more at home working in these school communities, making friends, learning new things, and at the end of the day leaves me with a good feeling that what I am doing is Important. With I can bring at least a smile to the children’s faces when they know they are learning something new!

 

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April 15-18, 2013 NYUAD hosted a donation drive to benefit the local migrant community in Abu Dhabi.  Check out their pictures and boxes of donations they collected in just a few days!

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NYU Florence - Alyssa

I grew up with parents who really valued volunteering and giving back to our community.  I am grateful that they have always encouraged my involvement with organizations such as the American Cancer Society in the United States and ANIMA (an after school gym for children with disabilities) in Florence, Italy.  Although volunteering is a way to help others, it is also a way to create new and meaningful relationships.  Because I have been able to work with so many amazing people, it feels like my “family” has never stopped growing.

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Asia - NYU Accra

"A life is not important except the impact that it has on other lives." -Jackie Robinson

 

I understand very well that the privileges that I have amassed have not been of my own doing but of the collective effort of my family, my community, and those who have taken great risks before me. There’s no way that  can return all those blessings. But volunteering helps me to try. BASICS International matters because every single life has value. In as far as educational opportunities improve the condition of those lives, then that is what I believe should happen. This is the work that they do. My approach is to promote democratic participation that enables the students to speak their mind and use those voices to change their communities in a positive way. At BASICS, I am facilitating a group of second graders in a service learning project that will allow them to do just that.

http://instagram.com/p/YaH2tXGF4b/

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esumimeetsaccra:

Dr. Abdulai is a spry, energetic Ghanaian man with an infectious smile and a certain bounce in his step. We arrive at his clinic in Tamale, Northern Ghana rather late. He arrives in style. The wire gates open to the clinic compound and a large SUV speeds in, as we all turn to gape at this…

(Source: esumif)

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shelbyinaccra:

Dr. Abdulai’s Clinic

I had the incredible opportunity to visit Dr. Abdulai’s clinic in the North East Region of Ghana about 2km from the Burkina Faso boarder. Dr. Abdulai is an incredible man you grew up extremely poor, but in light of his challenging situation got an education both in Ghana and abroad and became a doctor. He currently runs this clinic where patients are able to come in and be seen regardless of their ability to pay. It is run solely on donations. In addition to the drop in clinic, Dr. Abdulai has facilitates on the grounds were many of his patients are able to live.

My first impression of Dr. Abdulai is when he walked in to the covered sitting area, where the breeze was nicely blowing, in his shorts, t-shirt, and baseball cap, laughing. He sat down right beside one of his patients and first greeted them and then us. The way in which he talks to his patients in itself is uplifting. He does not speak down to them or speak simple because they may not understand. Instead he carries on interesting and often hilarious conversations with them. Even while talking to our group, he allowed the patients to interject their comments, which he would translate to English and share with us while often uncontrollably laughing. You could tell that he purely loves his job and what he is doing every day. He enjoys helping people and most of all seeing them happy.

The motto at the clinic is to not medicate mentally ill people, but rather to love them and show them that someone truly does care about them and enjoy their company. Through doing this, the patients desire to stay there at the clinic. Patients tend to find the environment to be a loving, welcoming, and encouraging opposed to hospitals where mentally ill patients can often be treated as less than a person. Dr. Abdulai shared with us that some hospitals in Ghana actually restrain mentally ill people, not allowing them to get up and move around freely. At Dr. Abdulai’s clinic the patients are all there on their own free will. At any time if they decide they want to leave they can simply walk out. A few of the people did choose to go home at different points, but after being home for a short amount of time would return because they simply are most happy at the clinic.

I saw many patients who had a psychological disorder, however they were happy. They were walking around the community carrying on conversations with themselves as well as Dr. Abdulai and simply enjoying their life. That is what it is all about, and Dr. Abdulai is helping many people have the best possible life they can. What an admirable man!

We love our friends in NYU Accra! 

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showUcare week

Rasha Shraim:

‘‘Why do I volunteer? The answer seems too obvious. However, I don’t have an eloquent response. I volunteer because, for me, it’s simply a must. I volunteer simply because I care and I feel indebted. We take and take and most often forget the part where we have to give back. This is my way of saying thank you. At the thrift store, many low-income people come in to pick out some tired clothes and things that even at insignificant costs, many cannot afford. The little that I give to keep the store functioning is a small part of my university’s thank you to our Abu Dhabi community.’’ 

http://instagram.com/p/Yx29eCGF0T/

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Photo contest has been extended to May 8th, midnight!
Photo contest has been extended to May 8th, midnight!
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“Students at NYU Abu Dhabi are showing they care! Amy care about Karimu International Help Foundation to help students in Bacho Tanzania receive full education and healthcare!”
Pictured: Amy Rosenberg!! http://facebook.com/NYUshowUcare

You can like Amy’s image on our page!

Students at NYU Abu Dhabi are showing they care! Amy care about Karimu International Help Foundation to help students in Bacho Tanzania receive full education and healthcare!”


Pictured: Amy Rosenberg!!

http://facebook.com/NYUshowUcare


You can like Amy’s image on our page!